Italian officer of Napoleon’s great army

 

Pietro Tarella (1781 – 1822), was an Italian officer and a Philhellene. One of the first organizers of a regular army in Greece and a hero of the battle of Peta.

He was born in Turin, but his parents, Francesco Tarella and Margherita Minuti, were from Cannero[1].

The bibliography does not provide us with information on the first years of his life. We know that in 1805 he enlisted as a second lieutenant in the army of the newly formed Kingdom of Italy, which was founded by Napoleon with regent Eugene de Beauharnais[2].

As an officer in the army of the Kingdom of Italy, he was a member of Napoleon’s Great Army during the Napoleonic Wars[3]. He served in 1805 as an officer of the guard of the English Channel and was promoted to lieutenant[4]. Then, in March 1807, he took part in the siege of Kolberg, Prussia, where he was promoted for his bravery second-class captain[5].

From May 5 to June 29, 1811, he took part in the victorious for the French siege of Tarragona in Spain[6]. On October 25, 1811, he fought in the victorious for the French Army, battle of Saguntum where he was promoted to first class captain for his bravery[7]. This promotion, as well as his skills as a commander, led the Italian regent Eugene de Beauharnais to approve the appointment of Tarella to his staff[8].

As a staff officer, Tarella took part on May 2, 1813, in the victorious battle for the French in Lützen, Saxony[9]. There he was promoted to Major[10].

On February 8, 1814, the battle of Mincio in Lombardy against the Austrians took place. This battle marked the end of the Kingdom of Italy as a state entity[11]. Thus Tarella enlisted in the French Army and took part in the Battle of Waterloo on June 18, 1815[12].

After the French defeat at Waterloo and the resignation of Napoleon from the French throne on June 22, 1815, Tarella returned to Turin[13]. There he was appointed in the General Staff of the Army of Piedmont with the rank of lieutenant colonel[14].

Tarella joined the liberal movements of his country, as a result of which he was demobilized due to his actions.

With the beginning of the Greek Revolution of 1821, Tarella is one of the first Philhellenes to decide to go to Greece and offer his services. He left Trieste and arrived in Greece (in Hydra) on June 7, 1821[15], with the same ship that carried Dimitrios Ypsilantis, Panagiotis Anagnostopoulos, the heroic French Philhellene Joseph Baleste and the important Italian Philhellene Dania[16].

On July 2, 1821, he was appointed aid de camp of Demetrios Ypsilantis and took part in the battle for the liberation of Tripolitsa. When the operations were completed, Tarella, the British chief of staff of Ypsilantis and prominent Philhellene Thomas Gordon, most of the Philhellenes, and Ypsilantis himself, undertook other missions and did not attend the entrance of the Greeks to Tripolitsa, on September 23, 1821[17].

After the battle of Tripolitsa, Tarella returned to Italy, with the aim of introducing more of his compatriots to the Philhellenic movement, and to procure ammunition for the Greeks fighters and the Philhellenes[18]. Instead, Dania stayed in Greece and took part in the first operation for the liberation of Nafplio, which took place in December 1821[19].

After completing his mission in Italy, Tarella returned to Greece on January 3, 1822[20]. There he undertook the task of forming the Infantry of the first Regular Army in Greece, according to the Law “On the Organization of the Army”, which was passed by the Parliament in Nafplio, on April 1, 1822 and which formed the basis of the military legislation[21].

Tarella took command of the 1st Infantry Regiment, with his direct collaborator, Andrea Dania, commander of the Battalion of the Philhellenes. The commander-in-chief of the Regular Army was the important German Philhellene General, Count Karl Friedrich Leberecht von Normann-Ehrenfels. The first mission of the Regular Army was the termination of the siege of Souli by the Ottoman forces, which would result in the revival of the Struggle in Epirus, the further strengthening of the Greek Forces with experienced officers, as well as the removal of the danger of an immediate descent of the Ottomans to suppress the Greek Revolution to the south[22].

Normann, Tarella and Dania faced several strategic issues. For example, decisions and moves were slow. Instead of the Greeks and Philhellenes moving quickly towards Arta, without allowing the Turks to gather an army that would give them a strategic advantage, they wasted valuable time. On the one hand, the Turks were gathering undisturbed forces, when on the other hand, the Greek army was beginning to face diseases and food shortages. Another big problem was the behavior of the irregular forces. And especially the one of Chieftain Bacolas. There were also concerns about how units of irregulars would be integrated into the battle plan. In fact, many days before the start of the march to Arta, it was rumored that Bacolas had a strange attitude and that he had a relationship with the Turks. Of course, it was impossible to believe that a Greek would betray the struggle of his compatriots[23].

The Greek forces came in contact with the Turks at Kompoti, on June 22, 1822. The war plan provided that, “the Philhellenes, as regular soldiers, should not seek the mountain tops to defend themselves comfortably, but to stay in the great and dangerous points and not to miss the opportunity to confront the enemy[24]. Following this, the 1st Infantry Regiment under Tarella and the Battalion of the Philhellenes under Dania, were placed at critical points at the foot of the hills. The enemy attack was successfully repulsed and the Turks retreated to Arta with heavy losses[25].

 

Representation of the battle of Kompoti. Work of Panagiotis Zografos, commissioned by General Makrygiannis (SHP Collection).

 

Already exhausted by fatigue, illness, hunger and thirst, the Philhellenes left from Kompoti in a hurry at night to Peta, where the Turks were moving. The other Greek forces gathered there, and the preparation for the battle began.

Disagreements arose in the war council of the leaders on two issues: 1) The position of the regular army in relation to the irregulars. That is, who would constitute the vanguard and who the rearguards, and 2) whether or not fortifications (tambouria) should be used. For the first one, the view which prevailed was to place the forces in a circle around Peta. Normann was dissatisfied with this decision and realizing the disadvantaged position of the Greek side, he felt obliged to express his concerns in a letter to Mavrokordatos[26]. Although he was the leader of the Greek forces, Mavrokordatos was absent from the battlefield. He had placed his headquarters in Lagada, six hours away from Peta[27]. In his letter, Normann stressed that the regular soldiers now numbered only 515[28]. He also noted that he was afraid that Bacolas would leave his post and that the other irregular fighters would not be able to help. Mavrokordatos was not convinced and the battle plan did not change. The Philhellenes accepted this decision out of courtesy[29].

After the leaders’ disagreement about the fortifications, the opinion which prevailed was that they should be built. In fact, as many sources confirm, the “tambouria” were also used by Philhellenes. This is a rare case in which European soldiers fought in the “Greek way”. That is, with the methods of the irregulars. It is worth noting that the Philhellenes had a different code of bravery and honor, which results from a position attributed to Dania: “our tambouria are our breasts”[30].

However, other mistakes were also made, which were due to the lack of complete control of the situation from the Philhellene officers. After the battle of Kompoti, Gennaios Kolokotronis and his Corps returned to the Peloponnese, following an order from his father, for which he was criticized[31]. At the same time, 1,200 Greek fighters left the camp and moved to the north to help the Souliotes. The corps comprised Markos Botsaris, Karatasos, Aggelis Gatsos, Georgios Varnakiotis, Alexakis Vlachopoulos and Andreas Iskos. These 1,200 fighters did not even manage to approach Souli. The Turks stopped them in the village of Plaka on June 29, 1822 and crushed them. Those who survived returned to Peta. Gogos Bacolas enticed Marco Botsaris to move towards Souli, and as soon as he left the camp, he warned the Turks to trap him in Plaka[32].

On the day of the battle of Peta, a Corps of Maniates also arrived in Splantza with Kyriakoulis Mavromichalis to help the Greeks. However, they did not form part of a single strategic plan. A corps of Souliotes arrived there and joined them to confront the Turkish forces that were sent to repel them. Kyriakoulis Mavromichalis himself was killed in this battle[33].

All these moves were out of the general coordination plan, and hindered the work of the Greek forces that would face the main attack of the Turks. But again, despite their small numbers, these forces could still be defeated.

At dawn on July 16, 1822, the attack of the Turkish forces that had arrived from Arta (7,000 to 8,000) began. Normann woke up the men, cheered them with warm words and inspected all positions on horseback.

 

Representation of the Battle of Peta. Work of Panagiotis Zografos, commissioned by General Makrygiannis (SHP Collection).

 

At first the forces of the Philhellenes and the Tactical Corps repulsed the numerous enemy troops with great success. The constant and coordinated shots reaped the attackers. The key to success in this way of warfare is for the soldiers to stay calm, to constantly and quickly load their weapons, to fire in a coordinated manner, and above all, to hold their ground, without allowing a rift in their ranks. The 1st Infantry Regiment and the battalion of the Philhellenes were an impenetrable wall, as Baleste’s training paid off[34].

Unfortunately, suddenly a fatal thing happened. Chieftain Bacolas and his men treacherously left their positions, opening the path for the Turkish forces to attack the rear of the 1st Infantry Regiment and the battalion of the Philhellenes[35]. Tarella was trying to encourage the men of his Regiment. He was surrounded by the attacking Turks and had a tragic death (he was beheaded)[36].

General Normann, the emblematic Philhellene, took himself the command of the 1st Infantry Regiment and led it back to battle, shooting: “For the salvation of the Philhellenes! Victory or death!”. In the ensuing raid, he received a bullet in the chest and was transported to the rear to treat his serious injury[37]. Gradually the Regiment began to recede and was now an easy target for the Turkish cavalry. The Philhellenes had been abandoned by all the forces of the irregulars. The forces of the Philhellenes and the Greeks from the Ionian islands experienced a sad and unjust disaster. They were surrounded by the enemy at an exposed point and were exterminated.

Amazing scenes of incredible heroism followed. Dania, who was cheering the soldiers of the battalion of the Philhellenes until the end, was surrounded by Turks, who beheaded him as they did with Tarella[38]. Fifteen brave Poles, led by the Polish officer Mierzewski, gathered at the St George’s Church in central Peta and fought with incredible heroism, even fighting on the roof of the church. They were all killed heroically[39]. In fact, the Turks set fire to the roof of the church to burn them alive beig unable to defeat them. A French officer, Mignac (who had clashed with German Philhellenes during the campaign), also fought with a heroism of Homeric proportions. The Turks tried to capture him alive because he was wearing an impressive uniform and they thought that he was General Normann, the leader of the Regular Army. Mignac refused to surrender and fought valiantly. In the end, being severely injured in the leg, because he could not stand, he leaned on the trunk of an olive tree to stay upright and by fighting in all directions, he neutralized fourteen more Turks. His body was full of wounds, and when he broke his sword, he committed suicide by cutting his throat[40].

Among the volunteers of the Regular Army, 160 Greeks from the Ionian islands and Philhellenes (one third of the forces) were killed. Many were taken prisoners to Arta and were killed there, after being tortured and humiliated in a horrible way. Many Philhellenes were forced to walk naked for hours, holding in their hands the heads of their comrades[41].

The few survivors gathered in Lagada; among them the tragic figure of the day, the noble and brave General Normann. As after the battle of Kompoti, so this time he arrived at the camp last on his dying horse and presented himself to Mavrokordatos, to whom he stated the following: “We lost everything your highness, except our honor![42]. The 1st Infantry Regiment, the Battalion of the Philhellenes, and hundreds of enthusiastic European Philhellenes, and Greeks from the Ionian islands, no longer existed.

 

Monument in Peta, in memory of the fallen Philhellenes in the battle of Peta

 

Greece and SHP pay tribute to Pietro Tarella and his brave comrades, who fought to the end for the Freedom of Greece and are eternally grateful for their sacrifice.

 

References

[1] Συλλογικό, “Tarella, Pietro”, εκδ. Α Spese Degli Editori, Φλωρεντία, 1853.
[2] Miller, E.J., “The Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy”, εκδ. περ. “The British Museum Quarterly“, Λονδίνο, 1967, τεύχος 31.
[3] Gregory, Desmond, “Napoleon’s Italy“, εκδ. Associated University Presses, Plainsboro, 2001.
[4] Elting, John R., “Swords Around A Throne: Napoleon’s Grand Armee“, εκδ. Free Press, Νέα Υόρκη, 1988.
[5] Horward, Donald D., “Napoleonic military history:a bibliography“, εκδ. Garland Publishing, Νέα Υόρκη, 1986, σελ. 639.
[6] Gates, David, “The Spanish Ulcer: A History of the Peninsular War“, εκδ. Pimlico, Λονδίνο, 2002.
[7] Smith, Digby, “The Napoleonic Wars Data Book “, εκδ. Greenhill, Λονδίνο, 1998.
[8] Φορνέζης, Ερρίκος, “Οι Φιλέλληνες”, εκδ. περ. “Εβδομάς”, Αθήνα, 1884, σελ. 125.
[9] Chandler, David G., “The Campaigns of Napoleon. The mind and method of history’s greatest soldier“, εκδ. Simon and Schuster, Νέα Υόρκη, 2009, σελ. 1120.
[10] Φορνέζης, Ερρίκος, “Οι Φιλέλληνες”, εκδ. περ. “Εβδομάς”, Αθήνα, 1884, σελ. 125.
[11] Uffindell, Andrew, “Great Generals of the Napoleonic Wars“, εκδ. Spellmount Ltd., Stroud, 2003.
[12] Stites, Richard, “The Four Horsemen: Riding to Liberty in Post-Napoleonic Europe“, εκδ. Oxford University Press, Λονδίνο, 2014.
[13] Βλ. στο ίδιο.
[14] Φορνέζης, Ερρίκος, “Οι Φιλέλληνες”, εκδ. περ. “Εβδομάς”, Αθήνα, 1884, σελ. 125.
[15] Πρασσά, Αννίτα, “Ο Φιλελληνισμός και η Επανάσταση του 1821”, εκδ. Δημιουργία, Αθήνα, 1999.
[16] Ξάνθος, Εμμανουήλ, “Απομνημονεύματα περί της Φιλικής Εταιρείας”, εκδ. Βεργίνα, Αθήνα, 1996, σελ. 168.
[17] Persat, Maurice, “Memoires du Commandant Persat, 1806 à 1844”, εκδ. Librairie Plon, Παρίσι, 1910, σελ. 87-88.
[18] Nada, Narciso, “La Partecipazione degli Italiani alla Guerra di Indipendenza Ellenica. Risorgimento Greco e Filellenismo Italiano: Lotte, cultura, arte”, εκδ. Edizioni del Sole, Ρώμη, 1986, σελ. 89.
[19] Συλλογικό, “Italy on the Rimland. Storia Militare di una Penisola Eurasiatica“, εκδ. Società Italiana di Storia Militare, Ρώμη, 2019, 1ος τόμος, σελ. 143.
[20] “Τα Αρχεία της Ελληνικής Παλιγγενεσίας”, εκδ. Βουλή των Ελλήνων, Αθήνα, 1857, α’ τόμος, σελ. 272.
[21] Διεύθυνση Ιστορίας Στρατού, “Η ιστορία του Ελληνικού Στρατού”, εκδ. Γενικό Επιτελείο Στρατού, Αθήνα, 1997.
[22] “Ιστορικόν Αρχείον Αλεξάνδρου Μαυροκορδάτου”, επιμ. Εμμ. Πρωτοψάλτης, Γενικά Αρχεία του Κράτους, Αθήνα, τόμος 1, φακ. 197, σελ. 254.
[23] Κουτσονίκας, Λάμπρος, “Γενική Ιστορία της Ελληνικής Επαναστάσεως”, εκδ. Δ. Καρακατζάνη, Αθήνα, 1863, δ’ τόμος, σελ. 177.
[24] Βυζάντιος Χρήστος, “Ιστορία των κατά την Ελληνικήν Επανάστασιν εκστρατειών και μαχών και των μετά ταύτα συμβάντων, ων συμμετέσχεν ο Τακτικός Στρατός, από του 1821 μέχρι του 1833”, εκδ. Κ. Αντωνιάδου, Αθήνα, 1874, σελ. 203.
[25] Συλλογικό, “Ιστορία του Ελληνικού Έθνους”, εκδ. Εκδοτική Αθηνών, Αθήνα, 2000, 12ος τόμος, σ. 232.
[26] “Ιστορικόν Αρχείον Αλεξάνδρου Μαυροκορδάτου”, επιμ. Εμμ. Πρωτοψάλτης, Γενικά Αρχεία του Κράτους, Αθήνα, τόμος 2, φακ. 548, σελ. 135.
[27] Φωτιάδης, Δημήτρης, “Η Επανάσταση του ’21”, εκδ. Μέλισσα, Αθήνα, 1971, β’ τόμος, σελ. 211.
[28] Βλ. στο ίδιο.
[29] Woodhouse, Christopher Montague, “The Philhellenes”, εκδ. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, Madison 1971.
[30] Βλ. στο ίδιο.
[31] Κολοκοτρώνης, Γενναίος, “Απομνημονεύματα”, εκδ. Βεργίνα, Αθήνα, 2006.
[32] Voutier, Olivier, “Απομνημονεύματα του συνταγματάρχη Olivier Voutier από τον πόλεμο των Ελλήνων”, μετ. Ειρήνη Τζουρά, επιμ. Παναγιώτα Παναρίτη, εκδ. Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο, Αθήνα, 2019.
[33] Περραιβός, Χριστόφορος, “Πολεμικά Απομνημονεύματα. Μάχες του Σουλίου και της Ανατολικής Ελλάδας 1820 -1829”, εκδ. Βεργίνα, Αθήνα, 2003, σελ. 160.
[34] St Clair, William, “That Greece Might Still be Free: The Philhellenes in the War of Independence”, εκδ. Open Books, Λονδίνο, 2008, σελ. 277.
[35] Κουτσονίκας, Λάμπρος, “Γενική Ιστορία της Ελληνικής Επαναστάσεως”, εκδ. Δ. Καρακατζάνη, Αθήνα, 1863, δ’ τόμος,σελ. 178.
[36] St Clair, William, “That Greece Might Still be Free: The Philhellenes in the War of Independence”, εκδ. Open Books, Λονδίνο, 2008.
[37] Gridley Howe, Samuel, “An Historical Sketch of the Greek Revolution”, εκδ. White, Gallaher & White, Νέα Υόρκη, 1828, σελ.
[38] Fassino, Pier Giorgio, “Andrea Dania”, εκδ. περ.”Accademia Urbense”, Ovada, Σεπτέμβριος 2006, σελ. 188.
[39] Τράιμπερ, Ερρίκος, “Αναμνήσεις από την Ελλάδα 1822- 1828”, επιμ. δρ. Χρήστος Ν. Αποστολίδης, ιδ. εκδ., Αθήνα, 1960, σελ. 136.
[40] Raybaud Maxime, “Mémoires sur la Grèce pour servir à l’histoire de la guerre de l’Indépendance, accompagnés de plans topographiques, avec une introduction historique par Alph. Rabbe”, εκδ. Tournachon-Molin Libraire, Παρίσι, 1824, τόμος 1.
[41] Βλ. στο ίδιο.
[42] Βλ. στο ίδιο.

 

Bibliography – Sources

  • Συλλογικό,  “Tarella, Pietro“, εκδ. Α Spese Degli Editori, Φλωρεντία, 1853
  • Miller, E.J., “The Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy“, εκδ. περ. “The British Museum Quarterly “, Λονδίνο, 1967, τεύχος 31.
  • Gregory, Desmond, “Napoleon’s Italy“, εκδ. Associated University Presses, Plainsboro, 2001.
  • Elting, John R., “Swords Around A Throne: Napoleon’s Grand Armee“, εκδ. Free Press, Νέα Υόρκη, 1988.
  • Horward, Donald D., “Napoleonic military history: a bibliography“, εκδ. Garland Publishing, Νέα Υόρκη, 1986.
  • Gates, David, “The Spanish Ulcer: A History of the Peninsular War“, εκδ. Pimlico, Λονδίνο, 2002.
  • Smith, Digby,  “The Napoleonic Wars Data Book“, εκδ. Greenhill, Λονδίνο, 1998.
  • Φορνέζης, Ερρίκος,  “Οι Φιλέλληνες“, εκδ. περ. “Εβδομάς“, Αθήνα, 1884.
  • Chandler, David G., “The Campaigns of Napoleon. The mind and method of history’s greatest soldier“, εκδ. Simon and Schuster, Νέα Υόρκη, 2009.
  • Uffindell, Andrew, “Great Generals of the Napoleonic Wars“, εκδ. Spellmount Ltd., Stroud, 2003.
  • Stites, Richard, “The Four Horsemen: Riding to Liberty in Post-Napoleonic Europe“, εκδ. Oxford University Press, Λονδίνο, 2014.
  • Πρασσά, Αννίτα, “Ο Φιλελληνισμός και η Επανάσταση του 1821“, εκδ. Δημιουργία, Αθήνα, 1999.
  • Ξάνθος, Εμμανουήλ, “Απομνημονεύματα περί της Φιλικής Εταιρείας“, εκδ. Βεργίνα, Αθήνα, 1996.
  • Persat, Maurice, “Memoires du Commandant Persat. 1806 à 1844“, εκδ. Librairie Plon, Παρίσι, 1910.
  • Nada, Narciso, “La Partecipazione degli Italiani alla Guerra di Indipendenza Ellenica. Risorgimento Greco e Filellenismo Italiano: Lotte, cultura, arte“, εκδ. Edizioni del Sole, Ρώμη, 1986.
  • Συλλογικό, “Italy on the Rimland. Storia Militare di una Penisola Eurasiatica“, εκδ. Società Italiana di Storia Militare, Ρώμη, 2019, 1ος τόμος.
  • “Τα Αρχεία της Ελληνικής Παλιγγενεσίας“, εκδ. Βουλή των Ελλήνων, Αθήνα, 1857, α’ τόμος.
  • Διεύθυνση Ιστορίας Στρατού, “Η ιστορία του Ελληνικού Στρατού“, εκδ. Γενικό Επιτελείο Στρατού, Αθήνα, 1997.
  •  “Ιστορικόν Αρχείον Αλεξάνδρου Μαυροκορδάτου“, επιμ. Εμμ. Πρωτοψάλτης, Γενικά Αρχεία του Κράτους, Αθήνα, τόμος 1.
  • St Clair, William, “That Greece Might Still be Free: The Philhellenes in the War of Independence“, εκδ. Open Books, Λονδίνο, 2008.
  • Voutier, Olivier, “Απομνημονεύματα του συνταγματάρχη Olivier Voutier από τον πόλεμο των Ελλήνων“, μετ. Ειρήνη Τζουρά, επιμ. Παναγιώτα Παναρίτη, εκδ. Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο, Αθήνα, 2019.
  • Κολοκοτρώνης, Γενναίος, “Απομνημονεύματα“, εκδ. Βεργίνα, Αθήνα, 2006.
  • Περραιβός, Χριστόφορος, “Πολεμικά Απομνημονεύματα. Μάχες του Σουλίου και της Ανατολικής Ελλάδας 1820 -1829“, εκδ. Βεργίνα, Αθήνα, 2003.
  • Συλλογικό, “Ιστορία του Ελληνικού Έθνους“, εκδ. Εκδοτική Αθηνών, Αθήνα, 2000, 12ος τόμος.
  • Κουτσονίκας, Λάμπρος, “Γενική Ιστορία της Ελληνικής Επαναστάσεως“, εκδ. Δ. Καρακατζάνη, Αθήνα, 1863, δ’ τόμος.
  • Fassino, Pier Giorgio, “Andrea Dania“, εκδ. περ. “Accademia Urbense“, Ovada, Σεπτέμβριος 2006.
  • Gridley Howe, Samuel, “An Historical Sketch of the Greek Revolution“, εκδ. White, Gallaher & White, Νέα Υόρκη, 1828.
  • Raybaud Maxime, “Mémoires sur la Grèce pour servir à l’histoire de la guerre de l’Indépendance, accompagnés de plans topographiques, avec une introduction historique par Alph. Rabbe“, εκδ. Tournachon-Molin Libraire, Παρίσι, 1824, τόμος 1.
  • “Ιστορικόν Αρχείον Αλεξάνδρου Μαυροκορδάτου“, επιμ. Εμμ. Πρωτοψάλτης, Γενικά Αρχεία του Κράτους, Αθήνα, τόμος 2.
  • Βυζάντιος Χρήστος, “Ιστορία των κατά την Ελλην. Επανάστασιν εκστρατειών και μαχών και των μετά ταύτα συμβάντων, ων συμμετέσχεν ο Τακτικός Στρατός, από του 1821 μέχρι του 1833“, εκδ. Κ. Αντωνιάδου, Αθήνα, 1874.
  • Φωτιάδης, Δημήτρης, “Η Επανάσταση του ’21“, εκδ. Μέλισσα, Αθήνα, 1971, β’ τόμος.
  • Woodhouse, Christopher Montague, “The Philhellenes“, εκδ. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, Madison 1971.
  • Τράιμπερ, Ερρίκος, “Αναμνήσεις από την Ελλάδα 1822- 1828“, επιμ. δρ. Χρήστος Ν. Αποστολίδης, ιδ. εκδ., Αθήνα, 1960.